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Medium Information

  • Acrylic – is a fast-drying paint and are water-soluble, but become water-resistant when dry. Depending on how much the paint is diluted with water, or modified with acrylic gels, mediums, or pastes, the finished acrylic painting can resemble a watercolor, a gouache or an oil painting, or have its own unique characteristics not attainable with other media.
  • Digital– the use of digital technology as part of the creative or presentation process.
  • Ink– is a liquid or paste that contains pigments or dyes and is used to color a surface to produce an image, text, or design. Ink is used for drawing or writing with a pen, brush, or quill.
  • Pencil (Color) – drawing executed with an instrument composed of graphite enclosed in a wood casing.
  • Pencil (Greyscale) – drawing executed with an instrument composed of graphite enclosed in a wood casing.
  • Oil– is the process of painting with pigments with a medium of drying oil as the binder. Commonly used drying oils include linseed oil, poppy seed oil, walnut oil, and safflower oil. The choice of oil imparts a range of properties to the oil paint, such as the amount of yellowing or drying time. Certain differences, depending on the oil, are also visible in the sheen of the paints.
  • Charcoal– charcoals are often used by artists for their versatile properties, such as the rough texture that leaves marks less permanent than other Visual arts media. Charcoal can produce lines that are very light or intensely black, while being easily removable, yet vulnerable to leaving stains on paper. The dry medium can be applied to almost any surface from smooth to very coarse. Fixatives are often used with charcoal drawings to solidify the position to prevent erasing or rubbing off of charcoal dusts.
  • Pastel– The pigments used in pastels are similar to those used to produce some other colored Visual arts media, such as oil paints. The color effect of pastels is closer to the natural dry pigments than that of any other process.
  • Water Colors– is a painting method in which the paints are made of pigments suspended in a water-based solution. The traditional and most common base for watercolor paintings is paper. Other bases include papyrus, bark papers, plastics, vellum, leather, fabric, wood and canvas. Watercolors are usually translucent, and appear luminous because the pigments are laid down in a pure form with few fillers obscuring the pigment colors.
  • Encaustic – this medium involves using heated beeswax to which colored pigments are added. The liquid or paste is then applied to a surface—usually prepared wood, though canvas and other materials are often used.